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Since its inception in 1994, the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center has treated more than 250 patients with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer with the highest quality medical care and personal attention.

A four-bed isolation unit surrounds a nurse’s station for close contact between patient and caregiver, and our Saint Louis University physician team is highly trained in bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cell and umbilical cord blood transplants.

The type of transplant a child receives depends on several factors, including the type and course of the disease, availability of suitable donors and the patient’s overall health. For umbilical cord blood transplants, the facility works closely with the St. Louis Cord Blood Bank, which is located on Glennon’s campus and is the second-largest independent cord blood bank in the world.

Through affiliations with Children’s Oncology Group (COG) and the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Consortium (PBMC), the stem cell unit at Cardinal Glennon participates in clinical research trials to further advance future transplants. It is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), and CAP. 

Related Links

      Saint Louis Cord Blood Bank

      Bob Costas Cancer Center

Information for Parents and Patients

The materials in this section are designed to help you and your family better understand the stem cell transplant process and prepare for admission to the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center.  If you have any questions about your child’s health in relation to stem cell transplants, please e-mail the doctor. We will try to answer your question by e-mail as soon as possible.

 
  Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Overview  
    Preparing for Your Hospital Stay  
    Ronald McDonald House  
    St. Louis Cord Blood Bank  

 

Visitation Policy

The visitation policy is designed to protect your child from exposure to colds, flu, and other viruses that may be transmitted to them by staff and visitors. A simple cold can be a very serious problem to a transplant patient. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask a nurse. The following are guidelines used in the transplant unit:

  • One parent/adult may spend the night in the room.
  • Please limit the number of visitors during a 24-hour period to a maximum of four people. This number includes parents.
  • No more than a total of four people in a patient room at a time. The air filtering system is not equipped to handle more than that number and maintain both maximum efficiency and a germ-free environment.
  • No one with a runny nose, cough, diarrhea, fever or other viral symptoms will be permitted to visit. No one with a recent exposure to someone who is ill should visit.
  • Keep the door to the patient room and the door to the patient restroom closed at all times. This insures proper functioning of the air filtration system.
  • Only the patients are to use the restroom in the patient room. There is a parent/visitor restroom directly outside the transplant unit doors.
  • Sibling visits can be arranged by talking with the physician or nurse. Situations will be evaluated on an individual basis.

Keeping in touch with special friends, family, and others who are unable to visit is important to many of our transplant patients. There are many creative ways to communicate including making videos, letter writing, phone calls, photo albums, or email. Please let us know if you have other ideas, as we are always looking for new ways to help our patients.