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TTTS Awareness Nights 
 

Twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) almost took the lives of identical twins Aiden and Blake Colp before they were born, but an innovative fetal surgery at the SSM St. Louis Fetal Care Institute gave them the chance at life.

Now, their parents David and Theresa Colp want to build awareness about TTTS and the life-saving fetal surgery option available in St. Louis at the St. Louis Fetal Care Institute. They are hosting TTTS awareness nights at Market Pub House (6655 Delmar Blvd, St Louis, MO 63130) on Friday, Sept. 5 from 6 – 10 p.m. and at Busch Stadium on Sunday, Sept. 21 during the St. Louis Cardinals game.

“Until we went through this experience we had no idea that there were treatment options for rare diseases like this in St. Louis,” said Theresa. “We want to make families aware that there are true professionals right here with the experience to help.” Proceeds from the events will benefit the St. Louis Fetal Care Institute, to help future families who face a TTTS diagnosis.

The evening at Market Pub House will include a silent auction and a raffle for the chance to throw out the first pitch, and watch batting practice on the field at the TTTS Awareness Night with the Cardinals on Sept. 21.

TTTS is a prenatal condition in which twins share unequal amounts of the placenta’s blood supply, resulting in them growing at different rates. This impacts the twins’ blood flow, and can be deadly to both babies. When Theresa was 21 weeks pregnant with the twins, they rapidly developed life-threatening TTTS. “It was so severe that I needed surgery the day I was diagnosed,” Theresa says.

Using minimally invasive fetal laser surgery, doctors can stop the negative impacts of TTTS while the babies are still in the womb. The St. Louis Fetal Care Institute is one of the few fetal care centers in the United States to offer this procedure. During the surgery, a laser is used to block the shared blood vessels. The surgeon inserts a pencil-tip-sized telescope in the mother’s uterus and examines the entire placenta to find the connected blood vessels. Once these are all mapped, a tiny laser fiber is inserted and laser energy is used to stop the blood flow between the twins.

“Separating the twin blood flow could be compared to separating the placenta, allowing each twin to develop independently,” says Dr. Mike Vlastos, director of the Fetal Care Institute. Because of the high-risk nature of her pregnancy, Theresa was placed on bed rest after her surgery, and then hospitalized for nine weeks before giving birth at 37 weeks.

On Oct. 14, 2012, Theresa and her husband David welcomed two healthy boys into the world via Cesarean section at SSM St. Mary’s Health Center. “The boys are a glowing example of the importance of consistent monitoring and prenatal care, especially in the case of twins,” says Vlastos. “Without this, and the immediate access to fetal surgery they may not be here today.”

Additional Information

Tickets to the TTTS Awareness Night with the Cardinals, commemorative t-shirts, and more information about both events are available here.

Aiden and Blake's story was recently featured in this video.


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